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Lemon Balm

$0.99 USD

Standard Packet Seed Count: Approx. 300 seeds

Days to Maturity: 180

Description:  Strongly lemon scented, fresh leaves give a nice lemon flavor to salads, soups, sauces and meats. Lemon Balm is also valued for its medicinal properties! It is used to treat colds, flu, and indigestion. It may be invasive.  Deadhead to stop self sowing. 

How To Grow

Sowing:  To start lemon balm indoors in a flat, sow on the surface of soil about 6 weeks before the last spring frost.  Provide moderate heat, but keep away from the hottest rays of the sun. For best results, water lightly with a spray bottle. Transplant outdoors as soon as the seedlings grow big enough to handle, or after the last spring frost.  It can also be easily grown in containers indoors, year round.

Growing:  Water regularly, but do not over water. Mature lemon balm tolerates drought conditions. It is also important to control weeds while the seedlings are becoming established because they compete for water and nutrients. Lemon balm attracts bees, birds, and butterflies.  However, it can become rather invasive if left to spread. To prevent this, remove the flowering stalks before they go to seed.

Harvesting:  Harvest fresh leaves as needed during the summer and fall. Lemon balm regrows well after cutting, even coming back after being cut nearly to the ground. The flavor of lemon balm reaches its peak immediately before flowering.  The best time to harvest lemon balm is in the morning after the dew has dried.  Fresh lemon balm leaves have the best flavor, though they can be dried or frozen.  If drying, make sure to dry them within 2 days of picking the leaves, and at a high temperature to prevent mold.  To save seeds, remove individual flowering stalks as they begin to dry and the seeds begin to develop. Spread them out to dry away from direct sunlight. Shake out the seeds and store in a cool, dry place.